qwazine.

...you know...stuff

thuggamane:

Ok so i’ve just seen this on my timeline on twitter and quite frankly I’m angry. This is in london and the metropolitan police here are known to be racist. With all that’s going on in America right now i thought I’d shed some light on what’s happening here in the UK. While its illegal to bear arms in this country, the systematic racism and discrimination still remains against black people, men in particular. Racial profiling is an epidemic and with social media at the forefront it’s been easier to really see how often this occurs, Please re blog this and spread this on your dashboard! These racist authorities need to be exposed!

soulbrotherv2:

Sexual Relations Between Elite White Women and Enslaved Men in the Antebellum South: A Socio-Historical Analysis

By Jacqueline M. Allain
Sexual Agency, Power, and Consent
According to one historian, “few scholars… have viewed the relationships of enslaved men and free white women through the lens of sexual abuse in part because of gendered assumptions about sexual power” (Foster, p. 459). This is in keeping with both the standard feminist conceptualization of rape as a tool of patriarchal oppression3 as well as the traditional (un-feminist) notion of women as too weak, emotionally and physically, to commit serious crimes, let alone sexual abuse, and the idea that men cannot be raped (Bourke, 2007, pp. 219, 328). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that women, too, are capable of committing sexual offenses and using sex as a means of domination and control (Bourke, pp. 209-248).

[Continue reading at Student Pulse:  The International Student Journal.]

soulbrotherv2:

Sexual Relations Between Elite White Women and Enslaved Men in the Antebellum South: A Socio-Historical Analysis

By Jacqueline M. Allain

Sexual Agency, Power, and Consent

According to one historian, “few scholars… have viewed the relationships of enslaved men and free white women through the lens of sexual abuse in part because of gendered assumptions about sexual power” (Foster, p. 459). This is in keeping with both the standard feminist conceptualization of rape as a tool of patriarchal oppression3 as well as the traditional (un-feminist) notion of women as too weak, emotionally and physically, to commit serious crimes, let alone sexual abuse, and the idea that men cannot be raped (Bourke, 2007, pp. 219, 328). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that women, too, are capable of committing sexual offenses and using sex as a means of domination and control (Bourke, pp. 209-248).

[Continue reading at Student Pulse:  The International Student Journal.]